Hypoglycemia Studies

Naloxone, Hypoglycemia, and Exercise

Preventing hypoglycemia after exercise can be difficult. The purpose of this study is to learn if naloxone can be used to treat exercise-related hypoglycemia symptoms. Naloxone is currently used as a substance abuse treatment medication but research studies have shown it to possibly be effective in preventing next-day hypoglycemia.

This study is looking for people who:

  • Are between the age of 18 – 65
  • Have type 1 diabetes for 2 - 30 years
  • Are willing to avoid exercise for the week before the study

This study involves one (1) screening visit where you will ride an exercise bike to determine your V02 max and wear a continuous glucose sensor (CGM).  About 1 week later,  you will return to the University of Minnesota for one (1) full day and one half (1/2) day visit.  At the full day visit, you will ride an exercise bike and be given either naloxone or a placebo.  The following day, we will lower your blood sugar to make you hypoglycemic and ask you about your symptoms.  You will return about 8 weeks later to repeat the full day and half day parts of the study. If all parts of the study are completed, compensation is up to $675.

Cerebral Responses to Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia

The purpose of this study is to determine what happens in different parts of the brain in response to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of diabetes treatments and having a greater understanding of how the brain adapts to low blood sugar may help us develop better and safer ways to treat diabetes.

This study is looking for people who:

  • Are between the age of 18 – 65
  • Have type 1 diabetes
  • Can undergo MRI scanning

This study involves one (1) half day visit (about 5 hours) to the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) at the University of Minnesota. While in a magnetic resonance scanner (MRI), we will make you hypoglycemic. Images of the brain will be taken with the MRI and blood will be collected for additional tests.  Compensation for this study is $150.

Recurrent Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

Individuals with type 1 diabetes often develop an impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH), meaning they are not fully aware of having low blood glucose levels. This research study is looking to determine what happens in the brain after repeat episodes of hypoglycemia. Having a greater understanding of how the brain adapts to low blood sugar may help us develop better and safer ways to treat diabetes.

This study is looking for people who:

  • Are between the age of 18 – 65
  • Have type 1 diabetes for 2 - 25 years
  • Can undergo MRI scanning

This study involves one (1) screening visit, wearing a continuous glucose sensor (CGM) and an activity/sleep tracker, and two (2) full day visits to the University of Minnesota Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR). On each of the full day visits, you will have your blood sugar lowered 2 times and we will take 1 MRI scan of your brain.  If all parts of the study are completed, compensation is up to $1,025.

Principal Investigator

Elizabeth Seaquist, MD


For More Information

studydiabetes@umn.edu
(612) 301-7040