Effect of Recurrent Hypoglycemia on Hypothalamic GABA

What is the Study about?

Glucose is a major fuel for most organs in the human body, particularly the brain. How and where the body uses glucose is regulated by a number of hormones, for instance insulin and glucagon. In a number of diseases, in particular diabetes mellitus, the glucose supply to the brain may be different than normal, which may be a cause for reduced glucose awareness.
The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of altered glucose metabolism on the brain. For example, patients with long duration diabetes mellitus lose their ability to secrete the hormones necessary to protect them against hypoglycemia, which may be due to alterations in glucose availability to the human brain.

Eligibility to participate

You may be eligible to participate in this Study if you:

  • Are between the ages of 18 – 65
  • Have Type 1 diabetes

This study is also accepting healthy participants.
This study is currently recruiting participants.

What is involved in the Study?

Participants with diabetes will: 

  • Visit the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) at the University of Minnesota once (1) for 4-6 hours
  • Be given an IV infusion of glucose, insulin, and potassium while in a high field magnetic resonance scanner (MRI).

Healthy participants will visit the Masonic Clinical Research Center (MCRU) and the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) at the University of Minnesota 2-4 times and participate in 2 protocols each over 2 days.

Protocol 1 (euglycemia)

  • Day 1: You will undergo 2 - 2 hour experiments where your blood sugar will be maintained in the normal range (euglycemia) by an IV infusion of glucose, insulin, and potassium.
  • Day 2: The procedure from the previous day will be repeated with the 2nd experiment conducted while in a high field magnetic resonance scanner (MRI).

Protocol 2 (hypoglycemia)

  • Day 1: You will undergo 2 – 2 hour experiments where your blood sugar will be decreased (hypoglycemia) by an IV infusion of glucose, insulin, and potassium
  • Day 2: The procedure from the previous day will be repeated with the 2nd experiment conducted while in a high field magnetic resonance scanner (MRI).

Principal Investigator

Elizabeth Seaquist, MD


For More Information

Anjali Kumar, PA-C
kumar045@umn.edu
(612) 624-0470