Parastoo Fazeli, MD

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatic and Autoimmune Diseases

Parastoo Fazeli

Contact Info

Mailing Address:
Division of Rheumatic and Autoimmune Diseases
420 Delaware Street SE
MMC 108
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Administrative Assistant Name
Rheumatology

Administrative Phone
612-624-5346

Administrative Email
rheumadm@umn.edu

Administrative Fax Number
612-624-0600

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatic and Autoimmune Diseases


Rheumatologist; Director, Lupus Clinic


Medical School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Internal Medicine Residency, St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, MD

Lupus Fellowship, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Rheumatology Fellowship, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Summary

Dr. Parastoo Fazeli is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology and is the Director of the Lupus Clinic. In 2008, she completed Internal Medicine Internship and Residency at St. Agnes Hospital; one of The Johns Hopkins affiliated hospitals. She was honored with the award of the best intern of the year. She was a chief resident during her third year of residency. In 2009, she completed Lupus Fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University. In 2011, she finished fellowship training in Rheumatology at the University of Virginia and served as a chief fellow during her second year of fellowship. She joined the division in August, 2011 and was elected as the director of lupus clinic. Dr. Fazeli has clinical and research interest in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), lupus in pregnancy and APS in pregnancy.

Professional Associations

  • Director of Lupus Center
  • Fellowship Program Director

Clinical

Specialties

  • Rheumatology

Clinics

Lupus Clinic;Rheumatology Clinic;University of Minnesota Medical Center

Board Certifications

  • Internal Medicine
  • Rheumatology

Clinical Interests

Lupus; Lupus in pregnancy; Anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS); APS in pregnancy; Sjogren's syndrome